Learn More About Stiff-Person Syndrome

Overview

Learn More About Stiff-Person Syndrome

One of the first steps after a stiff-person syndrome (SPS) diagnosis is understanding the condition. Diplomat is here to help.

But remember: The information here — and on linked sites — is not meant to replace advice, care, or a diagnosis from your physician. If you have questions about your condition, please ask your provider.

Overview

Stiff-person syndrome is believed to affect less than one in a million people. It involves muscle spasms and fluctuating rigidity in patients’ torsos and limbs. Spasms are often caused by external stimuli such as loud noises (e.g., an emergency vehicle siren), touch or emotional distress. Because of their heightened sensitivity, it can be difficult for patients to leave home.

Muscle spasms vary in severity and duration. In extreme instances, SPS patients suffer broken bones due to muscle spasms or have limited mobility. SPS affects both men and women, but women suffer about twice as often.

With treatment, SPS patients can often attain a better quality of life that might allow them to manage daily interactions that might otherwise be impossible.

Sources

National Organization for Rare Disorders

National Association of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

Medscape

The information contained herein may not be construed as medical advice. It is for educational purposes only. Diplomat Pharmacy Inc. takes no responsibility for the accuracy or validity of the information contained herein, nor the claims or statements of any manufacturer.