Learn More About Selective Immunoglobulin A Deficiency

Overview

Learn More About Selective Immunoglobulin A Deficiency

One of the first steps after a selective immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency diagnosis is understanding the condition. Diplomat is here to help.

But remember: The information here — and on linked sites — is not meant to replace advice, care, or a diagnosis from your physician. If you have questions about your condition, please ask your provider.

Overview

Selective immunoglobulin A deficiency involves a weakening of the immune system. This is rooted in the body’s B cells not being able to produce IgA. The antibody IgA protects the body’s mucous membranes (like the eyes, mouth, and nose) from infection.

Most people with selective IgA deficiency are not likely to suffer any more infections than someone without the deficiency. That said, a wide range of health conditions are possible. Patients with IgA deficiency are most at risk of recurring ear, lung, sinus, and gastrointestinal infection. Other possibilities include allergies, asthma, autoimmune diseases (e.g., rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease), and chronic diarrhea.

Sources

Immune Deficiency Foundation

The information contained herein may not be construed as medical advice. It is for educational purposes only. Diplomat Pharmacy Inc. takes no responsibility for the accuracy or validity of the information contained herein, nor the claims or statements of any manufacturer.